Dorothee Schumacher 7/22/15

A feature on one of our designers, Dorothee Schumacher, in Women's Wear Daily:

Dorothee Schumacher invited attendees to ground themselves and find a path to beauty — as she showed a collection vibrant with fantasy blooms.

The There was a personal letter from Dorothee Schumacher addressed to each attendee waiting on his or her seat at the designer’s two back-to-back shows at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Berlin’s new, more intimate Stage venue. It was a welcome note, but also almost a manifesto, encouraging guests to try to be grounded and find the path to beauty — and hence paradise.If that sounds a tad heavy, the clothes Schumacher sent forth from her stage-set garden were anything but. Abstract and tropical flowers — inspired by Japanese photographer Shigeo Goto — grew wild in different sizes and colors in one outfit, while elongated patches with thickly embroidered fantasy blooms added yet another botanic element to looks that nonetheless felt stylishly urban.


There was a length and a volume for all female sizes and shapes, from short, mid and long skirts that swung wide or fell closer to the body. Square little jackets in novelty florals or raw-edged raffia were sometimes cut out at the shoulders as were dresses and tops; lace-up closures and eyelet variations provided further airy effects. As one key German buyer summed it up, “It was all so pretty and fresh, and I loved how healthy the girls looked.” There was a personal letter from Dorothee Schumacher addressed to each attendee waiting on his or her seat at the designer’s two back-to-back shows at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Berlin’s new, more intimate Stage venue. It was a welcome note, but also almost a manifesto, encouraging guests to try to be grounded and find the path to beauty — and hence paradise.


If that sounds a tad heavy, the clothes Schumacher sent forth from her stage-set garden were anything but. Abstract and tropical flowers — inspired by Japanese photographer Shigeo Goto — grew wild in different sizes and colors in one outfit, while elongated patches with thickly embroidered fantasy blooms added yet another botanic element to looks that nonetheless felt stylishly urban.There was a length and a volume for all female sizes and shapes, from short, mid and long skirts that swung wide or fell closer to the body. Square little jackets in novelty florals or raw-edged raffia were sometimes cut out at the shoulders as were dresses and tops; lace-up closures and eyelet variations provided further airy effects. As one key German buyer summed it up, “It was all so pretty and fresh, and I loved how healthy the girls looked.”

By Melissa Drier